Demerara Style Brown Sugar

Demerara Style Brown Sugar

SKU Unit Size
21701 400 g
21708 1 kg
21702 2 kg
21703 5 kg
21704 10 kg
21705 20 kg
  • Description

    The name "Demerara" comes from a variant of the Arawak word "Immenary" or "Dumaruni" which means "river of the letter wood" (wood of Brosimum guianense tree). Demerara Style Sugar was originally created in Guyana (in a region formerly called Demerara in South America).

    Sugar production in Guyana began in the mid-1600s while the colony was still under Dutch control. By the end of the 18th century, there were more than 100 sugar plantations along the Demerara river. In the middle of the 19th century, the British took control of Demerara and sugar production significantly increased under them. There had been intense fighting in the area which made it difficult for production to get going.

    Compared to golden and brown sugar, Demerara retains most of the natural molasses, giving it a dark colour and deep rich flavour with large crystals that give a crunchy texture. Demerara sugar is lightly centrifuged, similar to the lower level of processing that turbinado sugar undergoes. As a result, it retains a mild note that is like butterscotch or caramel.

    The addition of molasses explains why brown sugar tends to have a somewhat moist texture. As a result, it's easier to mix into doughs and other recipes for baking. Demerara sugar has a deeper, darker flavour than that of brown because of its purity given that it's unadulterated, without the addition of any refined sugars.

  • Ingredients

    Sugar, molasses.

  • Directions

    How to make homemade Demerara Syrup

    1. In a saucepan over medium heat, combine demerara sugar and water.
    2. Stir until sugar dissolves (2-3 minutes) and remove demerara syrup from heat.
    3. Cool demerara syrup before using or storing.

  • Uses

    Most of the traditional uses for Demerara sugar are British. Demerara sugar can be used in so many ways in sweets, sauces, and drinks. Many bakers and chefs prefer it over other types of sugars for making cookies, shortbread, and cocktails.

    - It can be used to make toffees and candies since it has a toffee-like flavour.
    - It can be used as a replacement for granulated or light brown sugar in various sweet and savory dishes based on colour, depth of flavour as well as texture.
    - This sugar is sprinkled over cereals for enhancing the flavour.
    - The baked dishes having dried fruit or ginger has a great taste when mixed with Demerara sugar.
    - This sugar is often used as a sweetener for coffee and tea.

  • Storage

    Store in a tightly sealed container in a cool, dry place where it can be kept for indefinite time. If exposed to high humidity, low temperatures and/or top load pressure, the product has a tendency to harden.

  • Nutrition

    Nutrition Facts Per 1 tsp (4 g) Amount % Daily Value
    Calories 15 -
    Fat 0 g 0%
    Saturated Fat 0 g -
    + Trans Fat 0 g 0%
    Carbohydrate 4 g -
    Fibre 0 g 0%
    Sugars 4 g 4%
    Sugar Alcohol - -
    Protein 0 g -
    Cholesterol 0 mg -
    Sodium 0 mg 0%
    Potassium 10 mg 0%
    Calcium 0 mg 0%
    Iron 0 mg 0%
  • Recipes & Posts

SKU Unit Size
21701 400 g
21708 1 kg
21702 2 kg
21703 5 kg
21704 10 kg
21705 20 kg
  • Description

  • Ingredients

  • Directions

  • Uses

  • Nutrition

  • Storage

  • Recipes & Posts

  • The name "Demerara" comes from a variant of the Arawak word "Immenary" or "Dumaruni" which means "river of the letter wood" (wood of Brosimum guianense tree). Demerara Style Sugar was originally created in Guyana (in a region formerly called Demerara in South America).

    Sugar production in Guyana began in the mid-1600s while the colony was still under Dutch control. By the end of the 18th century, there were more than 100 sugar plantations along the Demerara river. In the middle of the 19th century, the British took control of Demerara and sugar production significantly increased under them. There had been intense fighting in the area which made it difficult for production to get going.

    Compared to golden and brown sugar, Demerara retains most of the natural molasses, giving it a dark colour and deep rich flavour with large crystals that give a crunchy texture. Demerara sugar is lightly centrifuged, similar to the lower level of processing that turbinado sugar undergoes. As a result, it retains a mild note that is like butterscotch or caramel.

    The addition of molasses explains why brown sugar tends to have a somewhat moist texture. As a result, it's easier to mix into doughs and other recipes for baking. Demerara sugar has a deeper, darker flavour than that of brown because of its purity given that it's unadulterated, without the addition of any refined sugars.

  • Sugar, molasses.

  • How to make homemade Demerara Syrup

    1. In a saucepan over medium heat, combine demerara sugar and water.
    2. Stir until sugar dissolves (2-3 minutes) and remove demerara syrup from heat.
    3. Cool demerara syrup before using or storing.

  • Most of the traditional uses for Demerara sugar are British. Demerara sugar can be used in so many ways in sweets, sauces, and drinks. Many bakers and chefs prefer it over other types of sugars for making cookies, shortbread, and cocktails.

    - It can be used to make toffees and candies since it has a toffee-like flavour.
    - It can be used as a replacement for granulated or light brown sugar in various sweet and savory dishes based on colour, depth of flavour as well as texture.
    - This sugar is sprinkled over cereals for enhancing the flavour.
    - The baked dishes having dried fruit or ginger has a great taste when mixed with Demerara sugar.
    - This sugar is often used as a sweetener for coffee and tea.

  • Nutrition Facts Per 1 tsp (4 g) Amount % Daily Value
    Calories 15 -
    Fat 0 g 0%
    Saturated Fat 0 g -
    + Trans Fat 0 g 0%
    Carbohydrate 4 g -
    Fibre 0 g 0%
    Sugars 4 g 4%
    Sugar Alcohol - -
    Protein 0 g -
    Cholesterol 0 mg -
    Sodium 0 mg 0%
    Potassium 10 mg 0%
    Calcium 0 mg 0%
    Iron 0 mg 0%
  • Store in a tightly sealed container in a cool, dry place where it can be kept for indefinite time. If exposed to high humidity, low temperatures and/or top load pressure, the product has a tendency to harden.