Organic Nettle Leaf

Organic Nettle Leaf

Urtica dioica

SKU Unit Size
80031 50 g
80032 100 g
80033 200 g
80034 400 g
80035 2 kg
  • Description

    Stinging Nettle is one of the first plants to emerge in the forest each spring, and it has an interesting history. One early example is the story of Julius Caesar’s troops rubbing themselves with Nettles, relying on the sting to keep them awake and alert during long and difficult northern campaigns between 58 and 45 BCE.

    Stinging Nettle is one of the richest sources of chlorophyll in the vegetable kingdom. A decoction of the plant has been used to produce a green dye for clothing for centuries. At the beginning of the Second World War, a request by the British government was made for the collection of 100 tons of Nettles, which were used for the extraction of this green dye for camouflage. This property has also been used commercially in Germany as a food colouring agent for canned vegetables.

    Nettle is abundant in the spring and it is a very nutritious leafy green that is high in vitamins, minerals and protein. Traditionally in western Canada, there were few edible plants in the early spring and Nettles were particularly prized. It was easily available to people as it could be foraged in the wild.

    Nettle prefers nitrogen-rich soil and is commonly found in the understory of riparian areas, along the edges of meadows, in open, rich forests, and in soil where animal or human waste is present.

    Fun Fact: Gastronomists are researching the use of stinging Nettle leaves to coagulate milk in fresh cheese making. Using Nettle instead of rennet would enable the development of more vegetable-based cheese production, and address the value of wild foraged plants in functional foods.

  • Directions

    - Tea - Boil water, steep dry Nettle Leaf with clarifying herbs like rosemary, sage, or antiseptic lavender for 3 to 5 minutes, and serve immediately. The tea will have an earthy, almost grassy flavour.

    - Hair Rinse - Prepare the tea as described above, and then add a few drops of your favourite essential oil, such as peppermint, to preserve it. (The dark, chlorophyll solution will last in the fridge for up to six months.) To apply, pour an ounce or two over your wet hair before you shampoo. Take a minute to massage it into your scalp or comb it through your hair. You can repeat the hair-strengthening rinse once a week for a healthy scalp and soft, shiny hair.

    - Infusion - When making a Nettle infusion, you'll use about one ounce of herbs for every quart of water and steep it at least 4 and up to 12 hours. As a result, Nettle infusions have a deeper flavor and a much higher micronutrient content than Nettle teas. Drink right away, or store the strained infusion in the fridge for up to 3 days.

  • Uses

    - An infusion of Nettle can be used as a hair rinse, to make hair soft and shiny.
    - Make a soup with Nettle leaves, potatoes, leeks and cream.
    - Stinging Nettle in a cordial is a refreshing herbal drink and can be enjoyed on its own or in a tasty adult beverage.
    - Nettle tea is believed to be one of the best herbal infusions for overall health and wellness.
    - To make a Nettle Herb Blend at home, combine dried Nettle Leaf with salt, black pepper, and your favourite dried herbs in a clean coffee grinder until combined. To boost the nutrition even more, consider grinding and adding seeds such as flax or sesame.
    - In place of Basil in a pesto, or in a 50/50 mix with Basil.
    - Atop pizza. Get creative with pickled Ramps and Nettle pesto, perhaps with some spicy vegan sausage.
    - A stinging Nettle infusion is an herbal tonic that you make by steeping dried Nettles in hot water for several hours. After steeping, you strain the liquid and drink it. Nettle infusions tend to be a good source of many micronutrients, like vitamins and minerals.

SKU Unit Size
80031 50 g
80032 100 g
80033 200 g
80034 400 g
80035 2 kg
  • Description

  • Directions

  • Uses

  • Stinging Nettle is one of the first plants to emerge in the forest each spring, and it has an interesting history. One early example is the story of Julius Caesar’s troops rubbing themselves with Nettles, relying on the sting to keep them awake and alert during long and difficult northern campaigns between 58 and 45 BCE.

    Stinging Nettle is one of the richest sources of chlorophyll in the vegetable kingdom. A decoction of the plant has been used to produce a green dye for clothing for centuries. At the beginning of the Second World War, a request by the British government was made for the collection of 100 tons of Nettles, which were used for the extraction of this green dye for camouflage. This property has also been used commercially in Germany as a food colouring agent for canned vegetables.

    Nettle is abundant in the spring and it is a very nutritious leafy green that is high in vitamins, minerals and protein. Traditionally in western Canada, there were few edible plants in the early spring and Nettles were particularly prized. It was easily available to people as it could be foraged in the wild.

    Nettle prefers nitrogen-rich soil and is commonly found in the understory of riparian areas, along the edges of meadows, in open, rich forests, and in soil where animal or human waste is present.

    Fun Fact: Gastronomists are researching the use of stinging Nettle leaves to coagulate milk in fresh cheese making. Using Nettle instead of rennet would enable the development of more vegetable-based cheese production, and address the value of wild foraged plants in functional foods.

  • - Tea - Boil water, steep dry Nettle Leaf with clarifying herbs like rosemary, sage, or antiseptic lavender for 3 to 5 minutes, and serve immediately. The tea will have an earthy, almost grassy flavour.

    - Hair Rinse - Prepare the tea as described above, and then add a few drops of your favourite essential oil, such as peppermint, to preserve it. (The dark, chlorophyll solution will last in the fridge for up to six months.) To apply, pour an ounce or two over your wet hair before you shampoo. Take a minute to massage it into your scalp or comb it through your hair. You can repeat the hair-strengthening rinse once a week for a healthy scalp and soft, shiny hair.

    - Infusion - When making a Nettle infusion, you'll use about one ounce of herbs for every quart of water and steep it at least 4 and up to 12 hours. As a result, Nettle infusions have a deeper flavor and a much higher micronutrient content than Nettle teas. Drink right away, or store the strained infusion in the fridge for up to 3 days.

  • - An infusion of Nettle can be used as a hair rinse, to make hair soft and shiny.
    - Make a soup with Nettle leaves, potatoes, leeks and cream.
    - Stinging Nettle in a cordial is a refreshing herbal drink and can be enjoyed on its own or in a tasty adult beverage.
    - Nettle tea is believed to be one of the best herbal infusions for overall health and wellness.
    - To make a Nettle Herb Blend at home, combine dried Nettle Leaf with salt, black pepper, and your favourite dried herbs in a clean coffee grinder until combined. To boost the nutrition even more, consider grinding and adding seeds such as flax or sesame.
    - In place of Basil in a pesto, or in a 50/50 mix with Basil.
    - Atop pizza. Get creative with pickled Ramps and Nettle pesto, perhaps with some spicy vegan sausage.
    - A stinging Nettle infusion is an herbal tonic that you make by steeping dried Nettles in hot water for several hours. After steeping, you strain the liquid and drink it. Nettle infusions tend to be a good source of many micronutrients, like vitamins and minerals.