Lavender Flower

Lavender Flower

Lavandula officinalis

SKU Unit Size
42191 3 g
25858 15 g
25851 50 g
25852 100 g
25853 200 g
25854 400 g
25855 2 kg
25856 5 kg
  • Description

    When one is feeling stressed out and anxious, the scent of lavender can be calming and soothing. Our lavender is culinary grade so you can enjoy it in a cup of tea or add it into your recipes at home. Lavender is historically known as the “herb of love”. The flowers have a deep blueish gray colour, with an intense, pleasant aroma and a slightly bitter taste. Lavender can be used to add flavour and colour to recipes. The flowers can give dishes a subtly sweet, citrus flavour.

    Our lavender is grown in France. Our lavender is harvested when the colour of the flower is most vibrant to make sure there is more flavour and fragrance once it is dried. The fresher the flower, the more flavourful its taste. The lavender flowers are picked in the morning when the dew has evaporated and before the heat of the day.

    Lavender is best harvested during June and July. Lavender is harvested only by following precise climatic rules. The harvesting is done depending on the hygrometry, or the air humidity, to be more precise. If there is a long drought period, this can advance the lavender harvesting period within a few days, while heavy rain falls can delay it.

    Lavender grows at altitudes situated between 600 m and 1,400 m. The flowers are completely open in July, but since the middle of June the fields are already covered in different shades of violet and the scent of lavender is present in the air.

    Lavender farming was invented almost a century ago in Provence, to meet the growing demands of France's perfume industry. The plant's popularity soared in World War I, when army doctors began using it as an antiseptic.

  • Directions

    Lavender & Chamomile Ice Cubes
    1 tablespoon Lavender Flower
    1 tablespoon Organic Chamomile Flower
    1 tablespoon Rose Petals
    3/4 cup honey

    1. In a medium saucepan, bring to a boil 2 1/2 cups water then add the lavender, chamomile, and rose petals.
    2. Steep for 10 – 15 minutes.
    3. Strain the mixture into a medium bowl and stir in the honey while the herbal water is still warm. Once the honey has dissolved, let the liquid cool, then ladle into ice cube trays and freeze.
    4. Optional: Don’t strain and leave the flowers in for an eye-catching addition to your drink.

  • Uses

    When one is feeling stressed out and anxious, the scent of lavender relaxes and soothes. It has been used to help ease stress and help with sleep problems. It also has a long history of skin care usage, it was valued for its disinfecting and antiseptic properties. It can be used for minor skin conditions, such as fungal infections, cuts, scrapes and even eczema.

    Make your own infusion: Steep 1 tablespoon dried lavender flowers in a cup of boiled water for 15 minutes. Cool and strain the liquid. It can be used as a compress, make sure to hold over affected area for 15 minutes. It can also be dabbed on cuts as a mild antiseptic.

  • Recipes & Posts

SKU Unit Size
42191 3 g
25858 15 g
25851 50 g
25852 100 g
25853 200 g
25854 400 g
25855 2 kg
25856 5 kg
  • Description

  • Directions

  • Uses

  • Recipes & Posts

  • When one is feeling stressed out and anxious, the scent of lavender can be calming and soothing. Our lavender is culinary grade so you can enjoy it in a cup of tea or add it into your recipes at home. Lavender is historically known as the “herb of love”. The flowers have a deep blueish gray colour, with an intense, pleasant aroma and a slightly bitter taste. Lavender can be used to add flavour and colour to recipes. The flowers can give dishes a subtly sweet, citrus flavour.

    Our lavender is grown in France. Our lavender is harvested when the colour of the flower is most vibrant to make sure there is more flavour and fragrance once it is dried. The fresher the flower, the more flavourful its taste. The lavender flowers are picked in the morning when the dew has evaporated and before the heat of the day.

    Lavender is best harvested during June and July. Lavender is harvested only by following precise climatic rules. The harvesting is done depending on the hygrometry, or the air humidity, to be more precise. If there is a long drought period, this can advance the lavender harvesting period within a few days, while heavy rain falls can delay it.

    Lavender grows at altitudes situated between 600 m and 1,400 m. The flowers are completely open in July, but since the middle of June the fields are already covered in different shades of violet and the scent of lavender is present in the air.

    Lavender farming was invented almost a century ago in Provence, to meet the growing demands of France's perfume industry. The plant's popularity soared in World War I, when army doctors began using it as an antiseptic.

  • Lavender & Chamomile Ice Cubes
    1 tablespoon Lavender Flower
    1 tablespoon Organic Chamomile Flower
    1 tablespoon Rose Petals
    3/4 cup honey

    1. In a medium saucepan, bring to a boil 2 1/2 cups water then add the lavender, chamomile, and rose petals.
    2. Steep for 10 – 15 minutes.
    3. Strain the mixture into a medium bowl and stir in the honey while the herbal water is still warm. Once the honey has dissolved, let the liquid cool, then ladle into ice cube trays and freeze.
    4. Optional: Don’t strain and leave the flowers in for an eye-catching addition to your drink.

  • When one is feeling stressed out and anxious, the scent of lavender relaxes and soothes. It has been used to help ease stress and help with sleep problems. It also has a long history of skin care usage, it was valued for its disinfecting and antiseptic properties. It can be used for minor skin conditions, such as fungal infections, cuts, scrapes and even eczema.

    Make your own infusion: Steep 1 tablespoon dried lavender flowers in a cup of boiled water for 15 minutes. Cool and strain the liquid. It can be used as a compress, make sure to hold over affected area for 15 minutes. It can also be dabbed on cuts as a mild antiseptic.