Horsetail

Horsetail

Equisetum arvense

SKU Unit Size
25178 25 g
25171 50 g
25172 100 g
25173 200 g
25174 400 g
25175 2 kg
25176 5 kg
25177 10 kg
  • Description

    Horsetail has been around for millions of years and is considered as a living fossil! Grown in damp and marshy ground areas, you may find this plant around your favourite lake or pond. The herbs long green and brown hollow stems can grow up to 2 feet tall and are studded with needle-like leaves resembling a horse’s tail – hence the name!

    Physicians in ancient Rome and Greece would often use horsetail as an herbal remedy to heal wounds and burns. Due to its high silica content, villagers would also use the mature tips as an abrasive to scrub their pots and pans. Proving that this plant was a household all-rounder!

    In modern times, the raw tips of a young plant can be harvested, cooked and eaten similarly to asparagus! Harvesting the horsetail plant is best done in the summertime when the plants are vibrant and green. Stems are picked and air dried in a cool and dark place before they are ground or cut.

  • Directions

    Horsetail Hair Rinse
    8 g Cut Horsetail
    4 g Whole Lavender Flowers
    454 ml Raw Apple Cider Vinegar

    Instructions:
    1. Combine dried herbs and apple cider vinegar in a sealed container. Shake mixture and allow to sit for 2-4 weeks.

    2. Strain herbs out of vinegar and store in a bottle or jar.

    3. Add 15 ml of the finished vinegar mixture to 2 cups of cool water to rinse hair.

  • Recipes & Posts

SKU Unit Size
25178 25 g
25171 50 g
25172 100 g
25173 200 g
25174 400 g
25175 2 kg
25176 5 kg
25177 10 kg
  • Description

  • Directions

  • Recipes & Posts

  • Horsetail has been around for millions of years and is considered as a living fossil! Grown in damp and marshy ground areas, you may find this plant around your favourite lake or pond. The herbs long green and brown hollow stems can grow up to 2 feet tall and are studded with needle-like leaves resembling a horse’s tail – hence the name!

    Physicians in ancient Rome and Greece would often use horsetail as an herbal remedy to heal wounds and burns. Due to its high silica content, villagers would also use the mature tips as an abrasive to scrub their pots and pans. Proving that this plant was a household all-rounder!

    In modern times, the raw tips of a young plant can be harvested, cooked and eaten similarly to asparagus! Harvesting the horsetail plant is best done in the summertime when the plants are vibrant and green. Stems are picked and air dried in a cool and dark place before they are ground or cut.

  • Horsetail Hair Rinse
    8 g Cut Horsetail
    4 g Whole Lavender Flowers
    454 ml Raw Apple Cider Vinegar

    Instructions:
    1. Combine dried herbs and apple cider vinegar in a sealed container. Shake mixture and allow to sit for 2-4 weeks.

    2. Strain herbs out of vinegar and store in a bottle or jar.

    3. Add 15 ml of the finished vinegar mixture to 2 cups of cool water to rinse hair.