Yarrow

Yarrow

Achillea millefolium

SKU Unit Size
25471 50 g
25472 100 g
25473 200 g
25474 400 g
25475 2 kg
25476 5 kg
25477 11.3 kg
  • Description

    Yarrow’s virtues as a healing herb have been well known through history. It’s Latin name, Achillea millefolium, is derived from the Greek Hero Achilles. In the legends, Achilles' soldiers used Yarrow to treat their wounds, so the plant is also called soldier's woundwort. In Greek mythology, it is said that when Achilles was born, his mother dipped him in Yarrow tea, holding him by the ankle.

    One of Yarrow's lessons and skills is about recognizing that wounds, especially deep ones, benefit from slow and carefully protected healing. In Medieval times, Yarrow leaves were rolled up and stuffed in the nose to stop bleeding. Yarrow helps to support blood flow and digestion.

    In ancient China, Yarrow was used to reawaken the spiritual forces of the mind. The plant was thought to balance yin and yang and to make possible the meeting of heaven and earth. In North America, the Native Americans used this herb to relieve both pain and inflammation from tooth, head, and ear aches. Native Americans also had remedies with Yarrow to reduce fever and promote healthy sleep habits. It has also been used to make Yarrow tea to ward off flies and mosquitoes. Pollen from Yarrow has even been found in ancient burial caves, suggesting that humans have been using Yarrow since prehistoric times

    Yarrow has long been a symbol of love. It often takes two or more years for Yarrow to grow from seed to become established. Once the plant has grown, it becomes a strong and lasting perennial who can endure conditions and neglect that would wither many other plants. Yarrow teaches us to nurture our love carefully at first, and then to trust that they’ll sustain us through whatever conditions we encounter. Yarrow is a reminder of lasting love of careful creation and lasting endurance.

    Yarrow can be found all over the globe and it can grow in most soils even thriving in poor conditions with little water. It grows from rocky beaches to alpine meadows. Plants that grow on wind swept sea cliffs and mountain sides have the strongest medicine. All parts of Yarrow are useful. The flower is most commonly used and should be gathered when it is fully open and but not yet turning brown or yellowish. The flower is higher in aromatic oils, whereas the leaves are higher in tannins. Leaves can be harvested any time of year but are most potent in spring and early summer. Our Yarrow is grown in the mountain regions across the Balkans.

  • Directions

    Add one heaping tablespoon of Yarrow into a tea ball or tea bag, place into a large cup, add boiling hot water, cover for 15 minutes and drink; sweeten with maple syrup or honey.

    Please note: Yarrow tea is not meant to be ingested daily for long periods of time or during pregnancy.

  • Uses

    - To make an infusion: Add 1/2 cup dried Yarrow into a 1 quart mason jar, pour in boiling hot water, cover and let infuse for 30 minutes.
    - Make a poultice with dried Yarrow flower tops.
    - Yarrow is most often taken as a tea or a tincture to support digestion and soothe stomach aches.
    - Yarrow leaf facial steams can be helpful for clogged pores and Yarrow tea as a hair rinse for dry or itchy scalps.

SKU Unit Size
25471 50 g
25472 100 g
25473 200 g
25474 400 g
25475 2 kg
25476 5 kg
25477 11.3 kg
  • Description

  • Directions

  • Uses

  • Yarrow’s virtues as a healing herb have been well known through history. It’s Latin name, Achillea millefolium, is derived from the Greek Hero Achilles. In the legends, Achilles' soldiers used Yarrow to treat their wounds, so the plant is also called soldier's woundwort. In Greek mythology, it is said that when Achilles was born, his mother dipped him in Yarrow tea, holding him by the ankle.

    One of Yarrow's lessons and skills is about recognizing that wounds, especially deep ones, benefit from slow and carefully protected healing. In Medieval times, Yarrow leaves were rolled up and stuffed in the nose to stop bleeding. Yarrow helps to support blood flow and digestion.

    In ancient China, Yarrow was used to reawaken the spiritual forces of the mind. The plant was thought to balance yin and yang and to make possible the meeting of heaven and earth. In North America, the Native Americans used this herb to relieve both pain and inflammation from tooth, head, and ear aches. Native Americans also had remedies with Yarrow to reduce fever and promote healthy sleep habits. It has also been used to make Yarrow tea to ward off flies and mosquitoes. Pollen from Yarrow has even been found in ancient burial caves, suggesting that humans have been using Yarrow since prehistoric times

    Yarrow has long been a symbol of love. It often takes two or more years for Yarrow to grow from seed to become established. Once the plant has grown, it becomes a strong and lasting perennial who can endure conditions and neglect that would wither many other plants. Yarrow teaches us to nurture our love carefully at first, and then to trust that they’ll sustain us through whatever conditions we encounter. Yarrow is a reminder of lasting love of careful creation and lasting endurance.

    Yarrow can be found all over the globe and it can grow in most soils even thriving in poor conditions with little water. It grows from rocky beaches to alpine meadows. Plants that grow on wind swept sea cliffs and mountain sides have the strongest medicine. All parts of Yarrow are useful. The flower is most commonly used and should be gathered when it is fully open and but not yet turning brown or yellowish. The flower is higher in aromatic oils, whereas the leaves are higher in tannins. Leaves can be harvested any time of year but are most potent in spring and early summer. Our Yarrow is grown in the mountain regions across the Balkans.

  • Add one heaping tablespoon of Yarrow into a tea ball or tea bag, place into a large cup, add boiling hot water, cover for 15 minutes and drink; sweeten with maple syrup or honey.

    Please note: Yarrow tea is not meant to be ingested daily for long periods of time or during pregnancy.

  • - To make an infusion: Add 1/2 cup dried Yarrow into a 1 quart mason jar, pour in boiling hot water, cover and let infuse for 30 minutes.
    - Make a poultice with dried Yarrow flower tops.
    - Yarrow is most often taken as a tea or a tincture to support digestion and soothe stomach aches.
    - Yarrow leaf facial steams can be helpful for clogged pores and Yarrow tea as a hair rinse for dry or itchy scalps.